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Wednesday, July 22, 2020 | History

8 edition of Soviet elite attitudes since Stalin found in the catalog.

Soviet elite attitudes since Stalin

Milton G. Lodge

Soviet elite attitudes since Stalin

by Milton G. Lodge

  • 216 Want to read
  • 35 Currently reading

Published by C. E. Merrill Pub. Co. in Columbus, Ohio .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Soviet Union
    • Subjects:
    • Kommunisticheskai͡a︡ partii͡a︡ Sovetskogo soi͡u︡za,
    • Soviet Union -- Officials and employees,
    • Soviet Union -- Politics and government -- 1953-1985

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliography: p. 124-127.

      Statement[by] Milton C. [i.e. G.] Lodge.
      SeriesMerrill political science series
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsJN6526 1969 .L64
      The Physical Object
      Paginationviii, 135 p.
      Number of Pages135
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5437631M
      ISBN 100675094356
      LC Control Number73086335

        Americans referred to Roosevelt as The President. British referred to Churchill as The Prime Minister. Germans referred to Hitler as Der Fuhrer. Soviets referred to Stalin as The Vozhd, meaning The Supreme Leader or The Boss (Robert Service’s book.   “The attitude towards the past is the central element of any ideology,” Yury Afanasyev, a Russian liberal historian, has written in Novaya , in Russia arguments about history.

      Most Western observers attributed post-Soviet attitudes favorable toward Stalin to the increasingly authoritarian rule of Vladimir Putin, the former KGB officer who became Russian president in Joseph Vissarionovich Stalin (stä´lĬn, Rus. vĬsəryô´nəvĬch stä´lyĬn), –, Soviet Communist leader and head of the USSR from the death of V. I. Lenin () until his own death, b. Gori, Georgia. His real name was Dzhugashvili (also spelled Dzugashvili or Djugashvili); he adopted the name Stalin ("man of steel") about

      This attitude would continue until the collapse of the Soviet Union in , but even today its effects are still being felt in the ex USSR. Bibliography In addition to the sources directly referenced in the footnotes below this essay relied on the information produced from the following sources. The death toll of the Great Famine () was not revealed by the Soviet Union in the census, as Joseph Stalin denied that there was any famine at all. As many as million Ukrainians perished in the famine, as did 2 million Kazakhs. Gulags, or Soviet death camps, were the sites of , executions.


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Soviet elite attitudes since Stalin by Milton G. Lodge Download PDF EPUB FB2

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Lodge, Milton. Soviet elite attitudes since Stalin. Columbus, Ohio, C.E. Merrill Pub. [] (OCoLC)   A New York Times Notable Book of "A tremendous achievement."--The Sunday Times (London).

The Whisperers is a triumphant act of recovery. In this powerful work of history, Orlando Figes chronicles the private history of family life during the violent and repressive reign of Josef by: Lodge collected data on the elite attitudes toward the Soviet political system in the post-Stalin era.

The ultimate aim or goal of the study was to gain a measure of the development of gruppovshchina, or elite groupism, since Stalin and, more specifically, "(1) to measure the extent to which the elites perceive themselves as participants in.

Evan Mawdsley is an international historian who has written extensively on the Second World War. Educated at Haverford College, the University of Chicago, and the School of Slavonic and East European Studies, his work for many years dealt with twentieth-century Russian history, where he wrote and taught on the revolution, the civil war, the Stalin period and the nature of the Soviet-era.

SCOTT-BOOK: More. On the Shelf. Soviet elite attitudes since Stalin [by] Milton C. [i.e. G.] Lodge. JN L43 Knowledge and power: the role of Stalin's secret chancellery in the Soviet system of government / [by] Niels Erik Rosenfeldt. -- JN R67 Public policy and administration in the Soviet Union / edited by Gordon B.

While hostility toward the West became increasingly common among the Russian political elite and parts of Russian society after the collapse of the Soviet Union, by a number of factors encouraged the Kremlin under Putin to promote history texts that not only denounced the West but also sought to deflect criticism of Stalin and Stalinism.

In most respondents had a neutral attitude towards Stalin. But sinceacross all age groups, the proportion of those with favourable opinions on Stalin has risen steadily. His book provides a fascinating chronicle of the Jewish rise to elite status in all areas of Soviet society—culture, the universities, professional occupations, the media, and government.

Indeed, the book is also probably the best, most up-to-date account of Jewish economic and cultural pre-eminence in Europe (and America) that we have. s Stalin's condemnation of antisemitism.

On 12 JanuaryStalin gave the following answer to an inquiry on the subject of the Soviet attitude toward antisemitism from the Jewish News Agency in the United States.

National and racial chauvinism is a vestige of the misanthropic customs characteristic of the period of -semitism, as an extreme form of racial. The history of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people (LGBT) in Russia and its historical antecedents (the Soviet Union and the Russian Empire) has largely been influenced by the political leanings of its al Catholic-Protestant Europe had the largest influence on Russian attitude towards homosexuality.

Russian LGBT history was influenced by the ambivalent attitude of the. Jews retained their elite status and occupational profile until the collapse of the Soviet Union inbut “the special relationship between the Jews and the Soviet state had come to an end—or rather, the unique symbiosis in pursuit of world revolution had given way to a unique antagonism over two competing and incommensurate.

In a remarkable book, The Alliance That Never Was and the Coming of World War II, the Canadian historian Michael Jabara Carley describes how, at the end of the s, the Soviet.

The Soviet Union was the first totalitarian state to establish itself after World War One. InVladimir Lenin seized power in the Russian Revolution, establishing a single-party dictatorship under the Bolsheviks.

After suffering a series of strokes, Lenin died on Januwith no clear. Rootless cosmopolitan (Russian: безродный космополит, romanized: bezrodnyi kosmopolit) was a pejorative Soviet epithet which referred mostly to Jewish intellectuals, as an accusation of their lack of patriotism, i.e., lack of full allegiance to the Soviet Union, especially during the anti-cosmopolitan campaign of – The anti-cosmopolitan campaign began in   The three neighbors had become victims of what Russians call "the Great Terror" of the late s, when Stalin purged the ranks of the Soviet elite in a bid to wipe out his enemies, real and.

‘Stalin’s city’ was a psychological as well as an industrial and strategic target for Hitler, and its capture would have been a devastating blow to Soviet morale.

(See map, p. ) Stalin was slow to respond to the German threat in the south because he thought that Hitler’s main target was Moscow.

STALIN’S WILLING EXECUTIONERS JEWS AS A HOSTILE ELITE IN THE USSR The Jewish Century Yuri Slezkine Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, $ (cloth) x + pages Reviewed by Kevin MacDonald A persistent theme among critics of Jews—particularly those on the pre-World War II right—has been that the Bolshevik revolution was a.

World War II Behind Closed Doors: Stalin, the Nazis, and the West - Kindle edition by Rees, Laurence. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading World War II Behind Closed Doors: Stalin, the Nazis, and the s: his book, Soviet Elite Attitudes Since Stalin, divides the Soviet elite into five separate types— the full-time Party functionaries, the econo­ mic administrators, the military, the literary intelligensia, and the.

The latter portion of Deutscher’s book thus takes on the character of a warning to that elite, and not an unfriendly warning either. The gist of his plea is, in his own words: “It is better to abolish the worst features of Stalinism from above than to wait until they are abolished from below.” (Yet earlier in the book he had stated that it was the “elite” which suffered most under.

Policy Attitudes of Soviet and American Elites," Journal of Conflict Resolution, vol. 8 (December ) ; Milton C. Lodge, Soviet Elite Attitudes Since Stalin (Columbus, ); David W. Paul, "Soviet Foreign Policy and the Invasion of Czechoslovakia: A Theory and a Case Study," International Studies Quarterly, 15 (June ): The late twenties and early thirties were perhaps the most transformative period in Soviet history.

It was during this period Stalin consolidated his grip on power and was allowed to rule with impunity, instituting his “revolution from above” on the Soviet people. He actively transformed the culture of the time, giving birth to a new Russian nationalism, rejecting the earlier Bolshevik.

If you grafted the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) with the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), added a few hefty tablespoons of paranoia and repression, and translated the whole megillah into Russian, you might wind up with something like the KGB.

The Soviet Union's main internal and external security agency from until the breakup of the U.S.S.R. inthe KGB wasn't .